Servpro of North Huntington

Fire and Water – Cleanup and Restoration


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Are you ready?

It is estimated that up to 50% of businesses that close due to a disaster, such as fire or water damage never reopen!  Of the businesses that survive, the overwhelming majority of them had a preparedness plan in place.  Are you “Ready for Whatever Happens”?

Preparation is a key component for making it through any disaster, whether its a small leak, a large fire or an area flood.  The SERVPRO Emergency Ready Profile (ERP) serves as a quick reference of important building and contact information or can be an ideal supplement to any well-designed contingency plan.  Working with a Restoration Company is a proactive measure that you shouldn’t pass up.

By working with SERVPRO of North Huntington to develop your personalized Emergency Ready Profile your business will receive the benefit of over 40 years of experience in reducing the impact of a disaster.

A timely response to a crisis will help prevent further damage and minimize business interruptions, saving you time and money.

Call Marian Bernard at 631-423-1734 today for a No-Cost Assessment of your facility!

Helping you to be “Ready for Whatever Happens” so we can make it “Like it Never Even Happened!”


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Summer Thunderstorms

Summer storms will be heading our way… be prepared!!

Quick heavy downpours can cause a lot of damage in a short time… power outages, downed trees and leaks through windows and doors. Keep an eye on your outside drains and sump pumps.

Make sure you have your insurance policy handy with all important information regarding coverage, deductibles and the phone number to the Insurance Claims Department.

And don’t forget to keep our phone number handy for your cleanup and restoration needs… SERVPRO of North Huntington 631-423-1734


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Your Pets and the 4th of July

More pets go missing on the 4th of July than any other day of the year.

  • Stay Inside – Keep your pets inside, and if possible, don’t leave them alone.
  • Make Them Feel Safe – Make sure they can access their crate or “safe space” and casually toss them a treat once in awhile.
  • Avoid the Noise – Drown out the noise of the fireworks as much as possible.  Close your windows and turn on the radio or television.
  • Act Normal – Talk to you pets in an upbeat voice and go about your usual activities.  You pet takes cues from you, if they sense that your confident and unafraid, they will most likely responds the same way.

Most importantly, make sure your pet is wearing an ID collar with your current contact information.  It is also best to have your pet microchipped.  Don’t let your dog being one of the missing.


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Fire Safety with BBQs

The summer season is here with fun, sun and BBQs… But with all that fun, safety is still a #1 priority, especially when using a grill.  We would like to remind everyone of a few simple steps they can take to protect their family, friends and home.

 Use Barbecue Grills Safely

  • Never leave a barbecue grill unattended.
  • Place the grill well away from siding, deck railings and out from under eaves and overhanging branches. Don’t use or store on a porch or balcony.
  • Place the grill a safe distance from lawn games, play areas and foot traffic.
  • Keep children and pets away from the grill area.
  • Use long-handled grilling tools for clearance from heat and flames when cooking.
  • Periodically remove grease buildup in trays below grill so it cannot be ignited by a hot grill.
  • Use only outdoors!  If used indoors, or in any enclosed spaces, such as tents, grills pose both a fire hazard and a risk of exposing occupants to carbon monoxide.

Continue reading


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What is Flag Day…

ImageHere are some tidbits about Flag Day….

Flag Day is celebrated on June 14th.  It commemorates the adoption of the United States flag – which happened on that day in 1777.   Although it is not an official Federal Holiday, a proclamation in 1916 was made by President Woodrow Wilson to officially proclaim the day as an Observance.   In 1937, Pennsylvania became the first (and only) state to celebrate Flag Day as a state holiday.

Several people or organizations played important roles in the establishment of a national Flag Day celebration.

1777 – BATTLE OF THE BRANDYWINE

A flag of this design was first carried into battle on September 11, 1777, in the Battle of the Brandywine. The American flag was first saluted by foreign naval vessels on February 14, 1778, when the Ranger, bearing the Stars and Stripes and under the command of Captain Paul Jones, arrived in a French port. The flag first flew over a foreign territory in early 1778 at Nassau, Bahama Islands, where Americans captured a British fort.

1861 – George Morris

The earliest reference to the suggestion of a “Flag Day” is cited in Kansas: a Cyclopedia of State History, published by Standard Publishing Company of Chicago in 1912. It credits George Morris of Hartford, Connecticut:

To Victor Morris of Hartford, Conn., is popularly given the credit of suggesting “Flag Day,” the occasion being in honor of the adoption of the American flag on June 14, 1777. The city of Hartford observed the day in 1861, carrying out a program of a patriotic order, praying for the success of the Federal arms and the preservation of the Union.

The observance apparently did not become a tradition.

1885 – BERNARD J. CIGRAND

Stony Hill School, in Waubeka, Wisconsin, the site of the first formal observance of Flag Day

Working as a grade school teacher in Waubeka, Wisconsin, in 1885, Bernard J. Cigrand held the first recognized formal observance of Flag Day at the Stony Hill School. The school has been restored, and a bust of Cigrand also honors him at the National Flag Day Americanism Center in Waubeka.

After that, Cigrand spoke around the country promoting patriotism and respect for the flag, and also the need for an annual observance of a flag day on June 14

1888 – WILLIAM T. KERR

William T. Kerr, a resident of Yeadon, Pennsylvania, for a number of years, founded the American Flag Day Association of Western Pennsylvania in 1888, and became the organization’s national chairman one year later, serving as such for fifty years.  He attended President Harry S. Truman’s 1949 signing of the Act of Congress that formally established the observance.

1889 – George Bolch

In 1889, the principal of a free kindergarten, George Bolch, celebrated the Revolution and celebrated Flag Day, as well.

1893 – Elizabeth Duane Gillespie

In 1893, Elizabeth Duane Gillespie, a descendant of Benjamin Franklin and the president of the Colonial Dames of Pennsylvania, attempted to have a resolution passed requiring the American flag to be displayed on all Philadelphia’s public buildings. This is why some credit Philadelphia as Flag Day’s original home.  In 1937, Pennsylvania became the first state to make Flag Day a legal holiday.

1907 – BPOE – Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks

American fraternal order and social club the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks has celebrated the holiday since the early days of the organization and allegiance to the flag is a requirement of every member. In 1907, the BPOE Grand Lodge designated by resolution June 14th as Flag Day. The Grand Lodge of the Order adopted mandatory observance of the occasion by every Lodge in 1911, and that requirement continues.

The Elks prompted President Woodrow Wilson to recognize the Order’s observance of Flag Day for its patriotic expression.

So we urge you, be proud and fly the American flag on June 14th.


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Know the Difference between Thunderstorm “Warning” and Storm “Watch” and know what to do…

A Severe Thunderstorm Watch tells you when and where severe storms are most likely to occur.  The best thing to do is watch the sky and stay tuned to radio and TV to know when warnings are issued. Watches are meant to heighten public awareness.

A Severe Thunderstorm Warning is issued when severe weather has been reported by spotters or indicated by radar. Warnings indicate imminent danger to life and property for those in the storm’s path.

What to do Before

  • Know what county you live and work in and the names of nearby major cities. Severe weather warnings are issued on a county basis.
  • Check the weather forecast before leaving for extended periods outdoors.
  • Watch for signs of approaching storms.
  • If a storm is approaching, keep a AM/FM radio with you.
  • Postpone outdoor activities if thunderstorms are imminent. This is your best way to avoid being caught in a dangerous situation.
  • Check on those who have trouble taking shelter if severe weather threatens.

When Thunderstorms Approach:

  • Remember if you can hear thunder, you’re close enough to the storm to be struck by lightning. Go to safe shelter immediately!
  • Move to a sturdy building or car. Do not take shelter in small sheds, under isolated trees, or in convertible automobiles.
  • If lightning is occurring and a sturdy shelter isn’t available, get inside a hard top automobile and keep the windows up.
  • Get out of boats and away from water.
  • Telephone lines and metal pipes can conduct electricity. Unplug appliances not necessary for obtaining weather information. Avoid using the telephone or any electrical appliances. Use phones ONLY in an emergency.
  • Don’t take a bath or shower.
  • Turn off air conditioners. Power surges from lightning can overload the compressors.
  • Get to higher ground if flash flooding or flooding is possible. Once flooding begins, abandon cars and climb to higher ground. Don’t try to drive to safety. Note: Most flash flood deaths occur in automobiles.

If Caught Outdoors and No Shelter is Nearby:

  • Find a low spot away from trees, fences and poles. Make sure the place you pick isn’t subject to flooding.
  • If you’re in the woods, take shelter under shorter trees.
  • If you feel your skin tingle or you hair stand on end, squat low to the ground on the balls of your feet. Place your hands on your knees with you head between them. Make yourself the smallest target possible and minimize your contact with the ground.
  • If you’re boating or swimming, get to land and find shelter immediately.
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